On my mind….

are bread tags – the new all singing all dancing cardboard ones – and the fact that more and more bread and bakery manufacturers are moving away from the plastic ones, using these on their products instead.


When these two came out of the freezer the other day – attached to bags of fruit loaf and hot cross buns – I noticed that as well as the use by date there were other pieces of information on them.

What I thought were flowers on one turned out to be the recycling logo…(bit thick aren’t I😊…plus the words ’place in used envelope’ on the other
That one baffled me.

Going off on a tangent here…..a few years ago I heard of a charity that collected all shapes and sizes of the plastic tags

Simple plastic one

to raise money to buy wheelchairs for children – Aussie Bread Tags for Wheelchairs
and I wondered what effect the use of the wizz bang carboard ones was having on their fundraising. Couldn’t find an answer to that but did find this on their website. 👇

Not realising there was a problem putting them loose in the yellow recycling bin it seems that from now on the few we get will have to go in the green waste bin – finding an intact used envelope is rare in our house….mine usually get cut up to use for ‘notes and lists’!

Another thing on my mind is….the new tags are not multi coloured. Without checking each tag how will I know how fresh the products are? 😊

#

24 thoughts on “On my mind….

    1. At a first glance they don’t look any different- it’s when they’re handled you notice the difference. If you don’t buy supermarket bread you’d not see them either

      Like

  1. Hari OM
    I miss those tags… here in the UK, they use plastic tape that is not recyclable in any way shape or form. I knew about the small things being a nuisance to recycle plants – bottle lids would either be kept with the bottle or bundled together in another container (used butter tubs are a good choice…) It occurs to me as I type that you could make a slit in the lid of a butter tub and ‘post’ these wee b*****s until it is full… &*> You’re welcome… YAM xx
    M=Messiah

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ooh some fruit and veg is packed with that stuff as a closure. I dislike it intensely- have to get a knife and ease it up of the plastic to be able to remove it without making a mess of the bag – if I tear it open it can’t be closed again. Yes like you I don’t like it at all.
      It would take me a long time to fill a Flora container so my tags will go with the garden waste now

      Like

  2. You will need to take your spectacles with you when shopping. Actually, make that a magnifying glass. I haven’t noticed cardboard tags yet. A friend makes art pieces from plastic tags. She won’t be pleased to see them disappear.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. There’s a lot of artists who use them Andrew – the cardboard ones won’t fare well outside, glue will just soak in so they’ll not be a good choice at all

      Like

    1. Those things come with packets of plastic bags…..I’ve got a drawer full of them! I tried twisting them together to form a long length to use in the garden, no luck, there was always a weak link somewhere

      Like

  3. I haven’t seen the cardboard tags yet but then I haven’t really looked! I do hate the plastic wire stuff. Interesting to note the rollers in the recycle plant. So much stuff we don’t know.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Don’t think we use those kind of tags here. I usually buy a fresh loaf in a paper bag. I’m glad you found out why you had to put the used ones in an envelope. It was worrying me lol

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Not many independent bakeries where I am Linda, there are bakeries but they are franchises – their goods costs the earth and don’t stay fresh very long. So I’m a supermarket user –

      Like

  5. I do think those cardboard tags are a great idea from a recycling perspective. As YAM says above, in the UK our loaves are sealed with frustrating sticky tape. However, I’m sure the origin for this must arise from my experience of a student job in a now defunct bakery where I had to manually change the coloured plastic tag on all the loaves that had failed to make the previous day’s shipment!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Sounds like an experience you’ll never forget!
      Do you mean the bakery sold them the next day indicating they’d been made that day (not the day before). How did you feel about being part of that rort?

      Like

      1. The guilt lives with me! However, students in need of a holiday jobs don’t have the luxury of resigning and there were tales from others of far worse in the factories where they were working!

        Liked by 1 person

  6. I am thicker than you, i have never even thought about recycle those plastic tags and have been tossing them amongst the garbage. now i will put them in a used envelope, have dozes of those from junk mail and all that goes in the blue recycle bin… thanks for the heads up. ours are still plastic, no sighting of cardboard.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. So much of our ‘rubbish’ is recycled in one way or another we have very little in our general waste bin. I think Australia is the first country to change to these tags

      Like

  7. We still have twisty wire. I did find out that I am not supposed to recycle my shredded papers after thinking I was being very diligent shredding them to avoid identity theft. It turns out they muck up the machinery. It is very difficult to be a good citizen these days!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’d never heard that about shredded paper. I just remove (tear off) names/addresses/ and any other ‘sensitive’ info – that goes shredded into the general waste which gets churned up in the truck before it goes to the tip to be tossed around before it’s buried. The rest of the paper goes in the recycling – that ends up being churned about in the truck before it arrives at the recycling plant….where they say no worker has time to pick up a sheet of paper, let alone read and digest anything on it😊

      Liked by 2 people

  8. We were going to mention the shredded paper thing but were slow off the mark. Carboard clips must be like shredded paper. Our bread is purchased without wrapping and goes into F’s cotton bread carrying bag. In the supermarkets the sliced stuff the call bread is in sort of heat sealed cellophane (do you recall bread in heat sealed waxed paper? ) does znyone make waxed paper any more?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The nearest independent bakery close to us is miles away – we do with national brand loaves but will buy a ‘special’ one now and again if we’re down that way. Means I have to sharpen the bread knife though…..and eat it over a couple of days because it never seems to taste the same after freezing.
      I’ve seen grease proof paper on sale – haven’t looked/had a need for waxed so wouldn’t know the answer to your question.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. the bread brand I use – comes as an entire package that unseals in one corner. I’ve no idea if you can reseal but that’s because I use a different storage system. And then a brand I’d not bought before with a garlic bread in was sealed up differently as well…”NO tags” – I suspect are still tags but have no idea on their “ingredients – i.e. plastic or cardboard

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Lol each bakery packs its goods in different ways….keep ‘em guessing – make a game out of how to open the box so they have to come back more frequently.

      Liked by 2 people

Comments are closed.